Don's Blog

Clay Shaw/Man of a Million Fragments: The True Story of Clay Shaw/Dueling Voices/I Lost It at the Beginning/101 Reasons Not To Murder The Entire Saudi Royal Family/He Knew Where He Was Going (?)

Sunday, October 15, 2017

Clay Shaw and Rudolf Hecht

Some readers of my biography of Clay Shaw, Man of a Million Fragments: The True Story of Clay Shaw, have asked about Rudolf Hecht and his relationship with Clay Shaw.

There is much about Hecht in the book, including his very active role on the Boards of Directors of both the International Trade Mart and International House from their inception until his death in early 1956. Hecht made a fortune in banking and shipping, and was well set when Shaw went to work under his supervision.

It is unclear exactly how he and Shaw first met, but Shaw worked for him as early as the spring of 1942, not long before going into the Army. Hecht and Theodore Brent were involved in a wartime shipping company, somewhat separate from the Mississippi Shipping Company, the main shipping company upon whose board both men sat.

Hecht seem to stay a bit behind the scenes in both International House and International Trade Mart, but was very active in decision-making. It is fair to say that nothing major was done without his approval.

While outside of the scope of my book, Hecht apparently was involved in some banking shenanigans leading into the Great Depression or coming out of it. He seemed to have escaped responsibility for many losing their savings, or at least such allegations were made. In one FBI memo I saw, it was said that in the 1930s, the FBI had recommended that Hecht be arrested and indicted for bank fraud, but that the local Federal attorney in New Orleans had shot the recommendation down.

Hecht was known for his world travels and the travelogues he wrote during those trips. In the 1940s, for instance, he made major trips to Africa, Asia, South America, country by country, all corners of the globe. He gave copies of each travelogue to Clay Shaw to read after Hecht returned from each trip. Once, Shaw wrote to him in a memo that he lived "vicariously" through Hecht's writings about such trips.

Hecht is largely forgotten today in New Orleans, like many around International Trade Mart and International House, but he was widely respected in the NOLA business world for most of the first half of last century.

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Time To Punish Roman Polanski

With the recent revelations about Harvey Weinstein, and his recent expulsions from various organizations related to the film industry, such as the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and others, the time has come to expel film director Roman Polanksi from all such organizations.

After all, Polanski admitted to raping a 13-year-old girl back in 1977. This was not statutory rape with a consenting minor; this was real rape. Over the years, his syncopants like Rob Reiner and Cahtherine Deneuve, have claimed he got a raw deal from the courts in Los Angeles. All that happened was that the judge, as was his discretionary right, may not have been willing to go along with the easy plea deal struck by prosecutors and defense attorneys.

Polanski had reached a plea deal where he would be sentenced to time already served in the jail system, not the prison system; the judge apparently gave some indications that he might not go along with it at final sentencing. That was the judge's right. If it wasn't, then the various attorneys could have appealed it. Maybe they were all incompetent. Who knows?

Polanksi should not only be kicked out of the various professional organizations he belongs to, but the district attorneys and assistant district attorneys who cut any such deal to release him should probably be subjected to new public scrutiny. Some are probably still alive; they know who they are.

The reason bad behavior goes on is partly because of the exceptions we allow. Everyone knows if this had been a black man or a poor white raping a 13-year-old girl, the sentence would have been somewhere between twenty years and life in a real prison, not jail.

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Sunday, September 24, 2017

Nashville: The Mood Picks Up Steam

Nashville: The Mood picks up steam in its e-book format, especially in European and Australian markets. Volume 6 has been completed in its initial draft, and editing has begun. The plan at the moment is to get to ten e-books and then publish that set of ten volumes as a print edition. Stay tuned!

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Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Clay Shaw and Theodore Brent

Some readers of my biography of Clay Shaw, Man of a Million Fragments: The True Story of Clay Shaw, have asked about Theodore Brent and his relationship with Clay Shaw.

There is much about Brent in the book, including his very active role as first President of the International Trade Mart from its inception into mid-1953. Brent came from a modest background, but in the rail and shipping industries, became a millionaire back when that meant being very wealthy. His estate in 1953 was valued at over $2 million.

It is unclear exactly how he and Shaw first met, but it was around 1930 or 1931, probably through Shaw's employment at Western Union (my speculation). It is also unclear how much of a mentor he was to Shaw, but he was clearly an important figure in Shaw's life. He left Shaw about $2,000 in his will (much less than Jim Garrison and others apparently thought), but he left other individuals much more. For instance, Shaw's assistant, J.B. Dauenhauer, received $5,000.

Brent is largely forgotten today in New Orleans, but he was widely respected in the NOLA business world for most of the first half of last century.

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Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Clay Shaw Bio Marches On!

I continue to hear good feedback about the biography of Clay Shaw, Man of a Million Fragments: The True Story of Clay Shaw. I have recently heard from several readers who were just discovering the book. Each knew one or more of the individuals who were friends or acquaintances of Clay Shaw, especially during the 1950s, around the International Trade Mart and International House. In general, they felt that the book had captured the spirit of that bygone era.

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